Dec 232016
 

The EGF has posted an interesting summary of research carried out by a team from China and Minnesota.

go brain

[activated] areas included the parts of the brain associated with concentration and attention, spatial perception, image manipulation, problem solving and memory processes (working memory storage and episodic memory retrieval)

source: EGF – Go & Brain

 Posted by at 21:31

DeepMind announces recipients of million dollar prize fund

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Jun 082016
 

The fund will be split between UNICEF UK, Raspberry Pi/Code Club, the American Go Association, the European Go Federation and the Korean Baduk (Go) Association.

source

*update* The AGA later posted a breakdown

The biggest recipient, UNICEF UK, will receive $450,000 to support global education work including girls’ education and gender equality, while $100,000 will be granted to Code Club UK for the creation of more clubs around the world for children to learn to program. The go community grant is $150,000 each to European Go Federation, the Korea Baduk Association and the American go entities. The AGF will receive $60,000 and the AGA $90,000, DeepMind said.

Earliest Surviving Go Manual

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Oct 192008
 

Attention was drawn to a fascinating artifact by a recent article in the AGEJ.

BRITS STUDY ANCIENT GO DOCUMENT: A 1200-year-old manuscript containing go proverbs and other instructions is being studied and conserved at the British Museum, with the help of The Zen Machine, a British group headed by Peter Wendes. The manuscript, thought to be the oldest surviving go manual, was discovered in 1900 among 40,000 similar scrolls in a cave near Dunhuang, a city of about 150,000 people in northwestern China. Located near the junction of the northern and southern Silk Roads, Dunhuang was an important military stronghold and center of exchange between East and West more than 2000 years ago. Buddhist monks constructed nearly 500 temples, the nearby Mogao Caves, and began collecting manuscripts from travelers. In 1900, a self-appointed guardian of these temples discovered a huge collection of artifacts in a walled-off section of one of these caves, and sold them to Hungarian archaeologist Aurel Stein for just 220 pounds and many of those manuscripts — including this one — wound up at the British Museum. According to Wendes, the manuscript, which measures about 6″ wide and 96″ long, has never been translated. If you can help, contact him at the Zen Machine.
by Roy Laird in American Go E-Journal Volume 9, #53: October 13, 2008